Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer Facts & Tips for Prevention

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world⁠.

In 2015, it was estimated that approximately 26,600 Canadians would be diagnosed with lung cancer.  That is more than any other type of cancer.

In addition to this, more people die from lung cancer than breast cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer combined.

There are two major types of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC)⁠.

Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 85 percent of lung cancers, small cell lung cancer about 15 percent.⁠

NSCLC usually starts in glandular cells on the outer part of the lung. This type of cancer is called adenocarcinoma. Non–small cell lung cancer can also start in flat, thin cells called squamous cells. These cells line the bronchi, which are the large airways that branch off from the windpipe (trachea) into the lungs. This type of cancer is called squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Large cell carcinoma is another type of non–small cell lung cancer, but it is less common. There are also several rare types of non–small cell lung cancer. These include sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.  SCLC usually starts in cells that line the bronchi in the centre of the lungs. The main types of small cell lung cancer are small cell carcinoma and combined small cell carcinoma (mixed tumour with squamous or glandular cells).

Anatomy & Facts About Our Lungs

 

 

Did you know?

  • In proper anatomy our right lung is shorter and wider than our left.  Our left lung is narrower and more oblong
  • The anterior border of the left lung is marked by a deep cardiac notch while the right lung is straight
  • Our left lung is smaller than our right lung because our heart occupies space on the left side
  • Our right lung consists of 3 lobes.  Our left lung has 2
  • Our right lung connects to the trachea by two bronchi while the left lung connects to the trachea by a single bronchus

Possible causes of lung cancer

🔹Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers.  Of note however many patients who are diagnosed with lung cancer have either never smoked or are former smokers.

🔹Exposure to high levels of pollution⁠

🔹Exposure to radiation and asbestos may increase risk of lung cancer⁠

🔹Genetics

Common symptoms of lung cancer

✔️A cough that doesn’t go away and gets worse over time⁠

✔️Constant chest pain⁠

✔️Coughing up blood⁠

✔️Shortness of breath⁠

✔️Fatigue⁠

Help lower your risk of lung cancer by incorporating the following tips

☑️Stop Smoking:⁠

Smoking is responsible for the majority of lung cancers. If you are a smoker it’s never too late to quit. For those who have been diagnosed with lung cancer, by stopping your smoking habit you can make cancer treatment more effective

☑️Limit Your Chemical Exposure:⁠

Chemicals in the workplace and at home can contribute to lung cancer

☑️Reduce Your Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke:⁠

Exposure to second-hand smoke increases your chance of developing lung cancer

☑️Consume Green Tea and Black Tea:⁠

Studies have shown that consuming Green & Black tea are associated with a reduced lung cancer risk⁠

As well as the above, proper sleep, exercising regularly and eating a diet rich in fruits and veggies are very important habits for cancer prevention as a whole.⁠


References

 

This Week on The Health Hub…5G: Awesome Technology or Hazard to Your Health? with Desiree Jaworski

Desiree Jaworski is Executive Director of the Center for Safer Wireless, a national nonprofit whose mission is to enhance public understanding of wireless technology and to recommend products to help mitigate the biological impact from wireless technology. She has researched, written and lectured on the topic of wireless radiation extensively. She has advocated for protective public policy regarding wireless technology at the Federal, State and Local level.  Her expertise has been featured in many local and national television reports, newspaper articles and documentaries regarding her work raising awareness on smart meters, wireless technology, 5G and the findings of the National Toxicology Program.  Recently, she was on the Dr. Oz television show.  She directs the Center’s public outreach programs, which include movie screenings, scientific forums and presentations.


Learning Points:

  • What is 5G?
  • What is its’ impact on the environment and our health?
  • How do we protect ourselves from the radiation emitted from these small cells?

Social Media

 


Listen live or catch the podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud!

Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.


TheHealthHub is now on iTunes!

Subscribe and don’t miss a single episode!


Follow us on Social Media

We are @thehealthhubrmc on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook


How To Listen Live

Visit our website and learn how to listen live to our show each week. http://www.radiomaria.ca/how-to-listen

Let us know!


If you have a health topic that you would like us to discuss or are a health care specialist who wants to be a guest on our show let us know!

Here is our email.  We would love to hear from you! thh@radiomaria.ca

 

 

 

Talk to Your Son About Testicular Cancer

Movember moustaches, campaigns and initiatives in support of raising the awareness of men’s health issues is a great opportunity to talk with your son about the warning signs of testicular cancer. It may not be a topic that you are comfortable with but it is a necessary one.

Testicular cancer is the leading cancer in men ages 15 to 44 with an estimated 1,150 Canadian men being diagnosed with it in 2019.

Who is at Risk?

Factors that can increase a man’s risk for testicular cancer include:

  • An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism). A man who has a testicle that hasn’t descended is at a greater risk of testicular cancer than are men whose testicles have descended normally. The risk remains elevated even if the testicle has been surgically relocated to the scrotum
  • If a family member has had testicular cancer, then there is an increased risk for related males
  • Abnormal testicle development. Conditions that cause testicles to develop abnormally may increase risk of testicular cancer
  • Although it can occur at any age, testicular cancer affects teens and younger men, particularly those between ages 15 and 44.
  • Testicular cancer is more common in white men than in black men

Important Things to Say

It is important to stress to your son that this cancer is not common and if found early is curable.

Let him know that he can come to you if he notices any changes or has any concerns or questions.

As your son reaches puberty and his body begins to change, encourage him to become familiar with his testicles.  Often testicles are not symmetrical.  He can only know if there is change if he knows what is his normal.

It is also important to teach your son how to perform a monthly self-exam so that he can monitor any changes that may have occurred in a testicle.

How to Perform a Monthly Testicle Self-Examinations

Have your son:

  • Stand in a hot shower, allowing his testicles to descend
  • Hold his penis out of the way and examine the skin of the scrotum
  • Examine each testicle. Using both hands, have him place his index and middle fingers under the testicle and his thumbs on top
  • Gently roll the testicle between your thumbs and fingers

What to Look for

A healthy testicle will have a soft, squishy consistency throughout.

Signs of irregularity can include hard lumps, changes in the size, shape or consistency of the testicle, tenderness or pain.

The anatomy of the testicle includes a structure called the Epididymis that your son will also need to become familiar with.  It is a cordlike structure running along back of the testis.  It provides for the storage, transport and maturation of sperm.

Self-care is a key piece for your son’s health.  By talking to your son about testicular cancer you equip him with tools for self management and help him to understand that ultimately he is responsible for his own health.

 

References:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/testicular-exam/about/pac-20385252

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/testicular-cancer-care/symptoms-causes/syc-20352986

https://www.testicularcancerawarenessfoundation.org/statistics-risk-factors/

https://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/testicular/statistics/?region=on

https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/testicular-exam/about/pac-20385252

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/epididymis

 

 

 

The Complete Lymphedema Management and Nutrition Guide by Jean Lamantia, RD and Ann DiMenna, PT, CDT

Lymphedema is abnormal swelling that is caused by a build-up of lymph fluid.  It occurs most frequently in the arms and in the legs and is commonly caused by the removal of or damage to lymph nodes as a part of cancer treatment.  In this scenario, the onset of lymphedema can occur during treatments, days, months or even years after the treatment protocol is completed.

According to the World Health Organization there are over 170 million people world-wide who suffer from secondary lymphedema.  It affects approximately 15% of all cancer survivors and an estimated 30% of those treated for breast cancer after surgery to remove lymph nodes.

Lymphedema is a chronic condition that, if not cared for, can lead to infection, thickening of the skin, pain and loss of proper function.  But with the help of professionals in the field and by learning techniques for self-care it can be managed.

Unfortunately lymphedema is poorly understood and researched.  For this reason the new book entitled:

The Complete Lymphedema Management and Nutrition Guide

Empowering Strategies, Supporting Recipes & Therapeutic Exercises

by Jean Lamantia, RD and Ann DiMenna, PT, CDT

is a great resource for both those suffering from lymphedema and for practitioners.

A Great Resource for those Suffering from Lymphedema and for Practitioners

Scientifically researched and thoughtfully put together, the book is divided in to four sections.

Parts 1 & 2 are authored by Ann DiMenna, PT, CDT.  Parts 3 & 4 by Jean Lamantia, RD.

Part 1: Understanding Lymphedema

This section beautifully lays out the physiology and biology of the lymphatic system as well as addressing Lymphedema Risk Reduction by using an easy to understand narrative coupled with informative visuals.

Part 2: Self-Care for Lymphedema

Self-care management is vital for those with lymphedema.  This section covers the key areas of skincare, self-taping, self-massage and exercise.  It also covers the topic of compression garments very well.

The next 2 sections cover the importance of nutrition for lymphedema management.

Part 3: Nutrition for Lymphedema

This is a very informative section of the book that covers these important topics for lymphedema management:

  • Bodyweight
  • The role of the lymphatics in digestion
  • Reducing Chronic Inflammation
  • Fluids, protein and sodium
  • Supplements
  • Meal Planning

Of note here as well, most of you know that I am a proponent of intermittent fasting.  Included within this section is an interesting notation from Jean about her thoughts on intermittent fasting and possible benefits for managing lymphedema.  She is very clear that her thoughts are speculative, not researched based, but I find the notion thought provoking at the very least.

 Part 4: Recipes for Lymphedema

And to wrap it up, the book contains some wonderful recipes to help the reader implement the nutritional advise that Jean Lamantia  has provided.

As a practitioner who works with patients suffering from lymphedema, I find this book to be a valuable reference.  As a sufferer of lymphedema myself, I know that this book will be of great benefit for those trying to manage this condition.

 

 

 

 

 

This Week on The Health Hub…The Impact of Exercise on Intestinal Health with Dr. Sara Campbell

Dr. Campbell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health. She received her BS and MS from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania and PhD from Florida State University. Following her PhD she completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship supported by the USDA. Currently, the Campbell research focuses on two lines of inquiry related to exercise and the intestine. The first includes how exercise impacts the gut microbiome. The microbiome is an expanding area of research focused on how high-fat diets alter the gut microbiome and how this impacts systemic health. Their second line of inquiry is focused on providing an understanding for how changes in the microbiome impact intestinal health and ultimately disease state.


Learning Points:

  • What is research telling us about the effects of high fat diets on microbes?
  • How does exercise modify gut microbes?
  • What types of exercise have the best benefit on gut microbes?

Social Media

Email: saracamp@kines.rutgers.edu

 


Listen live or catch the podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud!

Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.


TheHealthHub is now on iTunes!

Subscribe and don’t miss a single episode!


Follow us on Social Media

We are @thehealthhubrmc on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook


How To Listen Live

Visit our website and learn how to listen live to our show each week. http://www.radiomaria.ca/how-to-listen

Let us know!


If you have a health topic that you would like us to discuss or are a health care specialist who wants to be a guest on our show let us know!

Here is our email.  We would love to hear from you! thh@radiomaria.ca