This Week On The Health Hub…Linking the Microbiome To Autism with Dr. James Adams

James B. Adams, Ph.D., is the Director of the Autism/Asperger’s Research Program at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the medical causes of autism and how to treat and prevent it including the areas of nutrition (vitamins/minerals, essential fatty acids, carnitine, digestive enzymes, special diets), oxidative stress, gut problems, gut bacteria, toxic metals, and seizures.   He has published over 150 peer-reviewed scientific articles, including over 40 related to autism.  He is also the President of the Autism Society of Greater Phoenix, the President of the Autism Nutrition Research Center, the co-leader of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Autism Research Institute, and chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Neurological Health Foundation.  He has an adult daughter with autism.

Learning Points:

  • What are key prenatal nutrients that moms need to be aware of to minimize the risk of having a child with autism?
  • What is Microbiota transplant?
  • How is this improving the health of children with autism?

Social Media


Listen live or catch the podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud!

Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.


TheHealthHub is now on iTunes!

Subscribe and don’t miss a single episode!


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We are @thehealthhubrmc on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook


How To Listen Live

Visit our website and learn how to listen live to our show each week. http://www.radiomaria.ca/how-to-listen

Let us know!


If you have a health topic that you would like us to discuss or are a health care specialist who wants to be a guest on our show let us know!

Here is our email.  We would love to hear from you! thh@radiomaria.ca

 

 

Microbiome Testing: Another Marker Of Your Health

Guest Post Article By:

Richard Lin
Founder / CEO
www.thryveinside.com

 

As our “Father of Medicine,” Hippocrates said, “All disease begins in the gut.” Yet, the precursor to all disease is inflammation. Since our immune system is responsible for inflammation, there must be a tie between our gut health and our immune system. Well, there is! In fact, up to 80% of our immune cells reside in our gut. That’s why the key to a strong immune system is to improve your gut health!

What Causes Chronic Inflammation?

There are many triggers that set off an immune response in our system. Perhaps none are greater than our food sources. Many of the foods we eat are deficient in nutrients. They are fried in unhealthy fats, preserved with artificial ingredients, and sweetened with refined sugars. 

Many of these foods are made of ingredients that our healthy bacteria don’t enjoy. Therefore, solid food particles and artificial molecules remain in the body. So, our immune system kicks in to eliminate these potential hazards by causing inflammation. Once the threat is eliminated from the system, inflammation ceases. All is merry again.

Unfortunately, our round-the-clock diets have evolved to include a lot of inflammatory foods. From GMOs to increased sensitivity towards allergens to the use of pesticides, our food supplies set us up for a lifetime of inflammation. 

How Chronic Inflammation Ruins Gut Health

Our body is composed of trillions of microbes that range from bacteria to fungi to viruses. We depend on our gut bacteria to help keep a lot of these other microbes in check. All the while, we also depend on our gut bacteria to break down food, help create energy, and boost nutrient absorption. That’s a lot of burdens!

For our gut bacteria to work optimally, we must feed them a diet rich in fiber. Unfortunately, a vast majority of us don’t get enough fiber. So, over the course of this lifetime, we end up starving out our healthy bacteria.

Even worse, the immune system doesn’t have an ally that can help modulate inflammation. In turn, inflammation becomes chronic. As a result, immune cells and beneficial gut bacteria start to die off. 

Without healthy gut bacteria, the body is susceptible to viral, bacterial, and fungal attacks. When this happens, we can develop a litany of life-threatening illnesses, including cancer. 

How to Improve Gut Health and Immune System

Everyone’s body is different. Therefore, we all have different ratios of gut bacteria in the body. The key to fixing your gut health and immune system is to get a gut health test kit.

Microbiome testing company, Thryve, sends you everything you need to collect a sample from your toilet paper safely and mail it to their laboratory. Their specialists will analyze your DNA and give you an in-depth report of bacteria living in your gut.

Even better, they offer custom probiotics to help bring balance to your system. In turn, your immune system will have the backup necessary to help control chronic inflammation that can cause many chronic life-threatening conditions, including cancer. 

 

This Week on The Health Hub…The Impact of Exercise on Intestinal Health with Dr. Sara Campbell

Dr. Campbell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health. She received her BS and MS from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania and PhD from Florida State University. Following her PhD she completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship supported by the USDA. Currently, the Campbell research focuses on two lines of inquiry related to exercise and the intestine. The first includes how exercise impacts the gut microbiome. The microbiome is an expanding area of research focused on how high-fat diets alter the gut microbiome and how this impacts systemic health. Their second line of inquiry is focused on providing an understanding for how changes in the microbiome impact intestinal health and ultimately disease state.


Learning Points:

  • What is research telling us about the effects of high fat diets on microbes?
  • How does exercise modify gut microbes?
  • What types of exercise have the best benefit on gut microbes?

Social Media

Email: saracamp@kines.rutgers.edu

 


Listen live or catch the podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud!

Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.


TheHealthHub is now on iTunes!

Subscribe and don’t miss a single episode!


Follow us on Social Media

We are @thehealthhubrmc on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook


How To Listen Live

Visit our website and learn how to listen live to our show each week. http://www.radiomaria.ca/how-to-listen

Let us know!


If you have a health topic that you would like us to discuss or are a health care specialist who wants to be a guest on our show let us know!

Here is our email.  We would love to hear from you! thh@radiomaria.ca

 

 

 

Your Oral Biome and Its Link to Cancer Prevention

Let’s bring some awareness to the health of our mouth and how it can impact our overall health. Just as we have a gut microbiome (and several other biomes for that matter) that needs tending to, we also have an oral microbiome that requires care.

Without proper oral hygiene, the balance of good to bad bacteria can become skewed leading to tooth decay and gum disease.

Several studies have shown links between poor oral health and various illnesses including cardio vascular disease and bacterial pneumonia.

But why does this matter when we speak of a cancer? It’s because poor oral hygiene can lead to chronic inflammation. And chronic inflammation can underpin many diseases including cancer.  Note this excerpt from the abstract entitled: Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

Periodontitis (a chronic infection that affects the gums and the bones that support the teeth), characterized by epithelial proliferation and migration, results in a chronic release of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, prostaglandins, and enzymes, all of which are associated with cancer development

The pathway, in fact, is fairly straight-forward. C-reative proteins are released by the liver when toxic oral bacteria enter our circulatory system. This ignites the inflammatory response and if left unattended percolates as chronic inflammation.

Now not all inflammation is bad. In fact, inflammation is a necessary part of our immune system.(I have written a blog about the inflammatory response called “5 Foods that Help Fight Chronic Inflammation. You can read it here.) But chronic inflammation does us no good.

So achieving oral health is an extremely important part of prevention and is very important during active cancer.  And it’s all about promoting balance among the bacteria in your mouth.

5 Tips for achieving a healthy oral biome

Avoid Anti-Bacterial mouth washes

Anti-bacterial mouth washes throw the baby out with the bath water by killing both the good and bad bacteria in your mouth.  Want to freshen your breath?  Chew on some parsley.

Brush your teeth twice daily

Brushing your teeth twice a day helps to remove plaque, avoid cavities and prevent tooth and gum disease.

Floss daily

Flossing gets in to those hard to reach places that your tooth brush can’t.  As with tooth brushing, flossing helps to remove plaque, avoid cavities and prevent tooth and gum disease.

Have your teeth cleaned and checked regularly

Your dentist and hygienist are the batman and robin of oral health.  See them regularly!

Eat a healthy diet

Your mouth benefits as much as anywhere else by eating a healthy diet that full of fruits & vegetables and imited in processed foods & sugars.  Without a healthy diet your teeth and gums are susceptible to disease.

 


References:

Low-grade inflammation in chronic infectious diseases: paradigm of periodontal infections.

Systemic Diseases Caused by Oral Infection

Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

Chronic inflammation and cancer: The role of the mitochondria

Feeling the heat – the link between inflammation and cancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chronic inflammation can increase risk for cancer

Tips for caring for your oral biome

Avoid antibacterial mouth washes

Brush your teeth twice daily

Floss daily

Have your teeth cleaned regularly

Consider Oral Probiotics

This Week on The Health Hub…The Ocular Biome: The Microbiome in Your Eyes with Dr. Harvey Fishman

 

Dr. Fishman received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and a PhD in Physical-Analytical Chemistry at Stanford working in the area of lasers, microfluidics, and neuroscience. After his PhD, Dr. Fishman went on to earn his MD from Stanford and conducted post-doctoral research in Neurobiology working in the field of optic nerve regeneration.  After completing a medical internship in San Francisco, Dr. Fishman joined Stanford Ophthalmology to become the founder and director of the Ophthalmic Tissue Engineering Laboratory where he was awarded one of the first BIO-X grants on his work on an implantable artificial retina prosthesis.  After completing his residency training in advanced ocular surgery and medical treatment for eye diseases at Stanford, Dr. Fishman started his own concierge ophthalmology practice in Palo Alto where he conducts both basic science and clinical research in ocular surface disease and novel diagnostics for dry eye, cancer detection, and the ocular microbiome. Dr. Fishman has a special interest in digital health and has co-founded 3 companies in tele-ophthalmology.  Dr. Fishman has co-authored 34 Peer-reviewed Publications, 11 U.S. Patents, and his research has been highlighted in Scientific American, The Economist, JAMA, Technology Review: An MIT Enterprise, and recently in Ophthalmology Times.

 

Learning Points:

  • What is the Ocular Biome?
  • How can we improve the health of our Ocular Biome?
  • What are symptoms of an unhealthy Ocular Biome?

 

 

Listen live or catch the podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud!

 


Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.

TheHealthHub is now on iTunes!

Subscribe and don’t miss a single episode!

 

 


Follow us on Social Media


How To Listen Live

Visit our website and learn how to listen live to our show each week.
http://www.radiomaria.ca/how-to-listen


Let us know!

If you have a health topic that you would like us to discuss or are a health care specialist who wants to be a guest on our show let us know!

Here is our email.  We would love to hear from you!
thh@radiomaria.ca