Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer Facts & Tips for Prevention

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world⁠.

In 2015, it was estimated that approximately 26,600 Canadians would be diagnosed with lung cancer.  That is more than any other type of cancer.

In addition to this, more people die from lung cancer than breast cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer combined.

There are two major types of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC)⁠.

Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 85 percent of lung cancers, small cell lung cancer about 15 percent.⁠

NSCLC usually starts in glandular cells on the outer part of the lung. This type of cancer is called adenocarcinoma. Non–small cell lung cancer can also start in flat, thin cells called squamous cells. These cells line the bronchi, which are the large airways that branch off from the windpipe (trachea) into the lungs. This type of cancer is called squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Large cell carcinoma is another type of non–small cell lung cancer, but it is less common. There are also several rare types of non–small cell lung cancer. These include sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.  SCLC usually starts in cells that line the bronchi in the centre of the lungs. The main types of small cell lung cancer are small cell carcinoma and combined small cell carcinoma (mixed tumour with squamous or glandular cells).

Anatomy & Facts About Our Lungs

 

 

Did you know?

  • In proper anatomy our right lung is shorter and wider than our left.  Our left lung is narrower and more oblong
  • The anterior border of the left lung is marked by a deep cardiac notch while the right lung is straight
  • Our left lung is smaller than our right lung because our heart occupies space on the left side
  • Our right lung consists of 3 lobes.  Our left lung has 2
  • Our right lung connects to the trachea by two bronchi while the left lung connects to the trachea by a single bronchus

Possible causes of lung cancer

🔹Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers.  Of note however many patients who are diagnosed with lung cancer have either never smoked or are former smokers.

🔹Exposure to high levels of pollution⁠

🔹Exposure to radiation and asbestos may increase risk of lung cancer⁠

🔹Genetics

Common symptoms of lung cancer

✔️A cough that doesn’t go away and gets worse over time⁠

✔️Constant chest pain⁠

✔️Coughing up blood⁠

✔️Shortness of breath⁠

✔️Fatigue⁠

Help lower your risk of lung cancer by incorporating the following tips

☑️Stop Smoking:⁠

Smoking is responsible for the majority of lung cancers. If you are a smoker it’s never too late to quit. For those who have been diagnosed with lung cancer, by stopping your smoking habit you can make cancer treatment more effective

☑️Limit Your Chemical Exposure:⁠

Chemicals in the workplace and at home can contribute to lung cancer

☑️Reduce Your Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke:⁠

Exposure to second-hand smoke increases your chance of developing lung cancer

☑️Consume Green Tea and Black Tea:⁠

Studies have shown that consuming Green & Black tea are associated with a reduced lung cancer risk⁠

As well as the above, proper sleep, exercising regularly and eating a diet rich in fruits and veggies are very important habits for cancer prevention as a whole.⁠


References

 

Food Waste Costs Us All

I was prompted to do research on the topic of Food Waste before my interview with Chef Shane Jordan, author of the book Food Waste Philosophy.  I learned that the social, economic and environmental impact associated with food waste is a subject that we all should and need to be aware of.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year, approximately 1.3 billion tons, gets lost or wasted.  The FAO estimated that annually, the direct and indirect costs of food waste adds up to $2.6 trillion worldwide.

Bringing it a little closer to home, in the average Canadian household, one in four produce items gets thrown in the garbage.  That translates to about $1,100 a year that we just toss away.

The impact of food waste hits three areas significantly.  It wastes water, wastes land and releases significant amounts of methane gas.

Water Waste

Water is essential for growing agriculture and feeding animals.

When we throw out food we waste the millions of litres of water that were used to produce our food.

Consider this; meat producers are the heaviest water users. Yes, animals drink water.  But added to this, water is needed for the feed animals eat.  It takes about 8 to 10 times more water to produce meat than grain.

The consumption of animal products contributes to more than one-quarter of the water footprint of humanity

Land waste

Land is used for in the production of food for growing crops and raising and feeding livestock.

As well, discarded food eventually makes its way to landfills.

Food waste is both an ethical waste of land and a physical waste of space.

The land used for production, specifically the crops and grassland used in the actual growing (or raising, in the case of livestock), and the land used for retaining food that has been thrown out.

The consumption of animal products contributes to more than one-quarter of the water footprint of humanity”

Methane Gas

As food begins to decompose and rot it releases methane gas.

Methane is a greenhouse gas which many scientists believe adversely affects the earth’s climate and temperature.  About 20 per cent of Canada’s methane emissions comes from landfills.

Added to this the resources needed to produce the food also have a carbon footprint. Globally, the effect of processing the food that is wasted is equal to about 3.3 billion tons of CO2.

3 Tips for Preventing Food Waste

Meal plan

Meal planning is a good step towards reducing food waste.  It centres your shopping on what is specifically needed and helps you to avoid grabbing the ‘just in case items’.  You tend to not over shop when you know what ingredients you need.

Use your leftovers

Using your leftovers is an obvious way to reduce food waste.  I tend to make soups at the end of the week and throw in unused and leftover vegetables.

Leftovers can be repurposed in to new meals and lunches.  They can also be frozen to use at a later date.

Store Food Correctly

  • Move old things to the front of your pantry and fridge shelves and store new things at the back i.e. first in first out in
  • Date and label your food
  • Place things correctly in your fridge.  Store condiments and other items that don’t spoil easily on the fridge door.  Put your perishables on the shelves of your refrigerator.  Place fruits and vegetables in the fridge bins

References:

http://www.fao.org/3/a-i3991e.pdf

http://www.fao.org/save-food/resources/keyfindings/en/

https://farmtogethernow.org/2014/11/08/food-waste-causes-effects-and-solutions/

https://waterfootprint.org/media/downloads/Hoekstra-2012-Water-Meat-Dairy.pdf

https://davidsuzuki.org/queen-of-green/help-end-food-waste/

https://www.climatecentral.org/gallery/graphics/food-waste-methane-and-climate-change

 

 

 

This Week on The Health Hub… Food Waste Philosophy: Promoting Ways to Reduce Food Waste with Chef Shane Jordan

Chef Shane Jordan is a plant-based chef and environmental practitioner from the UK specializing in creating meals from surplus food and promoting ways to reduce food waste.

Chef Jordan has been described as a “pioneer” for his imaginative use of food waste in restaurants and has written a cookery book entitled “Food Waste Philosophy” detailing his alternative approach.

 Promoting sustainability outside the kitchen, he has partnered with a host of UK waste initiatives, including Vegfest UK, FoodCycle, Love Food, Hate Waste and Waste & Resources Action Programme.

Discussion Points:

  • What is the Food Waste Philosophy?
  • How Can We Reduce Food Waste?
  • What is Chef Jordan’s Philosophy on Cooking and Creating?

Social Media

https://twitter.com/FoodwasteShane

https://www.instagram.com/shane.jordan_foodwaste/

https://foodwastephilosophy.com/


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Every Tuesday from 11am -12pm I host The Health Hub, an interactive, forward thinking talk show on Radio Maria Canada.   Call, tweet or email your questions as together we explore health issues that are relevant to you from new and innovative points of view.

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This Week on The Health Hub…The Toxic Home with Dr. Robert Brown

Rob Brown, M.D.’s blended perspective of healthcare and wellness comes from his conventional career as a physician along with a deep rooted passion for wellness and spiritual exploration. As a radiologist, Dr. Brown has studied the health of over 300,000 patients and has come to the conclusion that wellness is optimally achieved by limiting daily exposure to environmental stressors and giving the body time and a place to heal from daily wear and tear.

 

Learning Points:

  • What are the most common sources of toxic exposure in today’s world?
  • What are recommendations for limiting daily exposure?
  • What are some of the “proven” health effects associated with exposure to electromagnetic frequency?